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Posts tagged as South Asian

Night market to celebrate culture and cuisine

While spreads of authentic bubble tea, butter mochi, dumplings, turon, samosas and taiyak are normally anomalous to find at Notre Dame,
The Notre Dame Taiwanese Student Association along with Multicultural Student Programs and Services and the Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies will cosponsor the event, transforming the Dahnke Ballroom in Duncan Student Center to imitate the bright and bustling street markets of Taiwan for the Notre Dame Night Market.While the event initially began four years ago as a collaboration between the Taiwanese Student Association (TSA) and the Japan Club, the Night Market has grown to include more than 10 clubs and organizations beyond the Asian-American community. “We actually have four new clubs joining us this year: Hawaii Club, Hong Kong Student Association, South Asian Student Association (SASA) and Chinese Culture Society (CCS),” senior Isabel Chan, co-president of TSA, said.
“Its just gotten bigger and better every year.”Each club will have its own booth to serve authentic food, and some of the clubs will set up traditional games for the regions they represent.The Night Market will also feature performances by Ballet Folklorico, Azul y Oro, Chinese Culture Society and Project Fresh. Senior Jonny Xu, co-president of TSA, said the Night Market brings the University’s cultural clubs together to celebrate their differences.“This is one of the only events where you can go and see all of the diversity and the different cultures represented at Notre Dame,” he said.Students will receive two free tickets at the door that can be used to redeem food and play games at the 11 booths.Additional tickets will cost $5 for five tickets and $8 for 10 tickets. The games also give students chances to earn raffle tickets to win various prizes including an Amazon Echo, Asian food baskets and more.
The Night Market drew around 300 people last year, said Chris Moy, junior and vice president of TSA, and they are hoping for an even bigger turnout this year because of the addition of a few organizations not present in past years.Chan said TSA allocates funds to the different clubs that participate in the event to spend on the food and games they will present at the Night Market.Moy also discussed how the Night Market benefits the clubs involved.“The Night Market empowers other cultural clubs to go out and do events and connect with the people that they meet through our event,” Moy said.Open to all members of the Notre Dame community, Chan and Moy said they encourage anyone who is interested to attend.Tags: Asian American Culture, Chinese Culture Society, Hawaii club, Hong Kong Student Association, Japan Club, Liu Institute for Asia and Asian Studies.
Notre Dame Night Market, Notre Dame Taiwanese Student Association, South Asian Student AssociationAbout Serena ZachariasContact SerenaRelated StoriesStudent groups prepare to host Notre Dame Night MarketStudents looking for a study break Thursday night can visit the Dahnke Family Ballroom.Students participate in Lunar New Year CelebrationHawaii club to host luauAsian Allure show combines Asian culture, showmanshipHide SidebarTrending Stories1When both sides balk: A conversation on abortion1Mid-semester ranks1Response to ‘The devil wears a MAGA hat’1Just one question, Crossroads team Feed IconPhotostreamV.J. Beachem got up to throw down earlier tonight in Philadelphia.Beachem posted 11 in the first half, but the Irish trail North Carolina at the break, 43-38.

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War is mad, isn’t Modi too?

Many in the world are portraying India and Pakistan at the moment as two nuclear antagonists perilously close to mutual assured destruction.
We’ll pick time, place to hit back, read newspaper headlines.That moment came within 24 hours. On Wednesday morning, Pakistan struck back.Not only Pakistan Air Force jets thundered over the Line of Control in Kashmir, they shot down chasing Indian planes. In response to PAF strikes IAF crossed [the] LOC.
PAF shot down two Indian aircraft inside Pakistani airspace. One of the aircrafts fell AJ&K while [the] other fell inside IOK.One Indian pilot arrested by troops on ground while two in the area, tweeted Pakistani Director General of the Inter Services Public Relations, Major General Asif Ghafoor.Millions upon millions of Pakistanis on social networking platforms sizzled the whole day rebuking their Indian counterparts, the Bollywood celebs, the Indian who’s who for prematurely jumping with joy on the fakery coined by the Modi administration to ramp up its dwindling electoral projections.
India had claimed of destroying a terror camp and some 250 terrorists training therein. Some dreams turnout to be uglier than nightmares.Powerful capitals, who are now universally known for rewarding India despite its abysmally criminal record of human rights violations in Kashmir and against its own minorities, woke up to ask Pakistan and India to exercise restraint. Strange that they were admonishing Islamabad only a day earlier asking it to put a stop to cross-border terrorism or to put an end to the activities of the terrorist groups established in its territory.Probably Washington DC, Paris, Bonn and Canberra found it hard to see their powerful South Asian proxy being slapped across the face by a smaller but nuclear-armed adversary. Images of the captured Wing Commander Abhinandan were enough for the Indian government to come crashing down from the high pole of psychedelic elation it was unnecessarily feeling for achieving something phantasmagoric only a day earlier.
Two substantial countries going to war has always been a dreamlike scenario for the runners of the western military industrial complex. Prospects of deals and contracts worth billions upon billion would make many a fool go mad.
The spectre of a nuclear confrontation, however, is too serious a business to be left to New Delhi or Islamabad. So phones started ringing.Ministers began speaking to counterparts lecturing how wonderful is peace as an idea between two itchy neighbours.One may criticise PM Khan for being an administrative novice or a political upstart but his words sense and sagacity — reminded many of Jane Austin’s Sense and Sensibility’.He may not be an astute politician or a statesman of note but he comes across as an honest human who earnestly desire peace and prosperity in the region. The difference between him and his Indian counterpart is stark.He is neither a killer of people nor has he allowed massacre of innocent humans. Modi had.During a court proceeding probing the Gujarat massacre of Indian Muslims in the summer of 2002, Sanjiv Bhatt, a senior Indian police officer told the Indian Supreme Court that he attended a meeting at which Modi allegedly said that Hindus should be allowed to vent their anger after the Godhra train tragedy killing 58 that his government tried to plaster over ISI-backed elements within India. Those allegations have since proven false and fabricated though Modi has always denied any wrongdoing.But international websites are full of implicating evidence that Modi had spoken to his goons a night before the riots that saw around 2,000 Indians dead and told them Muslims needed to be taught a lesson. Government estimates put the number of dead at 1,000.Hundreds of girls and women were raped and killed. International rage was genuine against Modi to an extent that he was denied a diplomatic visa by the United States and his already granted visit visa was revoked as well.Writing for the Guardian newspaper in Britain, Aditya Chakrabortty said in 2014; Narendra Modi, a man with a massacre on his hand is not the reasonable choice for India. Similar voices are being heard in India today.
While millions may be following him madly, many millions also believe that Modi is more dangerous than a declared terrorist, a hardcore fanatic or a frenzied fanatic.Only such a person would attempt to punish a state for the alleged felony of a group of individuals.Pakistani state or government did not attack India in Pulwama just like it was not involved in Uri or Mumbai. But madly wanting to emulate the post 9/11 United States, India thought it could cook up stories about Pakistan’s wrongdoing in Kashmir and elsewhere in India and attempt to punish it to please electoral audiences.
Dreaming about punishing Pakistan is one thing. Carrying out foolish plans is another.Pakistan is painstakingly setting its direction right. Mistakes it made for others have returned to haunt it with deadly effect.The best India could do is to mind its own business and leave Pakistan alone to correct course.The best that Indians could do for themselves is to get rid of the madman of Indian politics Narendra Modi, before he attempts to push South Asia and adjoining regions into a nuclear winter.Pakistan protested strongly but warned sternly that the aggression would be revenged. “We’ll pick time, place to hit back,” read newspaper headlines.
That moment came within 24 hours. On Wednesday morning, Pakistan struck back.Not only Pakistan Air Force jets thundered over the Line of Control in Kashmir, they shot down chasing Indian planes. “In response to PAF strikes IAF crossed [the] LOC.PAF shot down two Indian aircraft inside Pakistani airspace. One of the aircrafts fell AJ&K while [the] other fell inside IOK.One Indian pilot arrested by troops on ground while two in the area”, tweeted Pakistani Director General of the Inter Services Public Relations, Major General Asif Ghafoor.Millions upon millions of Pakistanis on social networking platforms sizzled the whole day rebuking their Indian counterparts, the Bollywood celebs, the Indian who’s who for prematurely jumping with joy on the fakery coined by the Modi administration to ramp up its dwindling electoral projections.
India had claimed of destroying a terror camp and some 250 terrorists training therein. Some dreams turnout to be uglier than nightmares.Powerful capitals, who are now universally known for rewarding India despite its abysmally criminal record of human rights violations in Kashmir and against its own minorities, woke up to ask Pakistan and India to exercise restraint. Strange that they were admonishing Islamabad only a day earlier asking it “to put a stop to cross-border terrorism” or “to put an end to the activities of the terrorist groups established in its territory.”Probably Washington DC, Paris, Bonn and Canberra found it hard to see their “powerful” South Asian proxy being slapped across the face by a smaller but nuclear-armed adversary. Images of the captured Wing Commander Abhinandan were enough for the Indian government to come crashing down from the high pole of psychedelic elation it was unnecessarily feeling for achieving something phantasmagoric only a day earlier.Two substantial countries going to war has always been a dreamlike scenario for the runners of the western military industrial complex. Prospects of deals and contracts worth billions upon billion would make many a fool go mad.
The spectre of a nuclear confrontation, however, is too serious a business to be left to New Delhi or Islamabad. So phones started ringing.
Ministers began speaking to counterparts lecturing how wonderful is peace as an idea between two itchy neighbours.One may criticise PM Khan for being an administrative novice or a political upstart but his words – sense and sagacity reminded many of Jane Austin’s ‘Sense and Sensibility’.
He may not be an astute politician or a statesman of note but he comes across as an honest human who earnestly desire peace and prosperity in the region. The difference between him and his Indian counterpart is stark.He is neither a killer of people nor has he allowed massacre of innocent humans. Modi had.During a court proceeding probing the Gujarat massacre of Indian Muslims in the summer of 2002, Sanjiv Bhatt, a senior Indian police officer told the Indian Supreme Court that he attended a meeting at which Modi allegedly said that Hindus should be allowed to vent their anger  after the Godhra train tragedy killing 58 that his government tried to plaster over ISI-backed elements within India. Those allegations have since proven false and fabricated though Modi has always denied any wrongdoing.
But international websites are full of implicating evidence that Modi had spoken to his goons a night before the riots that saw around 2,000 Indians dead and told them “Muslims needed to be taught a lesson”. Government estimates put the number of dead at 1,000.Hundreds of girls and women were raped and killed. International rage was genuine against Modi to an extent that he was denied a diplomatic visa by the United States and his already granted visit visa was revoked as well.
Writing for the Guardian newspaper in Britain, Aditya Chakrabortty said in 2014; “Narendra Modi, a man with a massacre on his hand is not the reasonable choice for India.” Similar voices are being heard in India today.
While millions may be following him madly, many millions also believe that Modi is more dangerous than a declared terrorist, a hardcore fanatic or a frenzied fanatic.Only such a person would attempt to punish a state for the alleged felony of a group of individuals.
Pakistani state or government did not attack India in Pulwama just like it was not involved in Uri or Mumbai. But madly wanting to emulate the post 9/11 United States, India thought it could cook up stories about Pakistan’s wrongdoing in Kashmir and elsewhere in India and attempt to punish it to please electoral audiences.Dreaming about punishing Pakistan is one thing. Carrying out foolish plans is another.Pakistan is painstakingly setting its direction right. Mistakes it made for others have returned to haunt it with deadly effect.The best India could do is to mind its own business and leave Pakistan alone to correct course.The best that Indians could do for themselves is to get rid of the madman of Indian politics – Narendra Modi, before he attempts to push South Asia and adjoining regions into a nuclear winter.

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On the brink

IT is a wildly provocative and shockingly aggressive act – and the potential repercussions may extend to the hitherto unthinkable possibility of war itself between the two South Asian neighbours.

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Pakistan Navy rescues stranded civilians in flood-hit Balochistan areas

QUETTA – Pakistan Navy successfully conducted rescue operation in Uthal, Balochistan and saved 42 precious lives including women and children, who were stranded in rain-hit areas in the southwestern province.Upon the request of District Administration of Lasbela, the Navy personnel promptly dispatched rescue teams along with requisite equipment and boats to the rescue site.Accordingly, 42 personnel including 20 men, 10 women and 12 children of Goth Ali Pur were rescued.The National Disaster Management Authority said 14 people were killed and 200 families were affected by flash floods that submerged villages near the southwestern town of Lasbella.A control room has been set up at the Chief Minister Secretariat in Quetta under the special instruction of the Chief Minister Balochistan, Mir Jam Kamal Khan.
The control room will immediately respond to the rains affected people across the province and coordinate between the flood-hit people and concerned officials in order to provide relief to them instantly.The rain and flood-hit people have been advised to contact on following telephone numbers 081-9202061, 081-9202069, 081-9201798, 081-9202424 and Whatsapp number 0336-8005960 at any time for any help.Meanwhile, heavy rains wreaked havoc in In Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, resulting in the death of twenty-three people.Six people died in Upper Dir, five in Kohat, four in Khyber, three in Bajaur and two each in Nowshera and Hangu and one in Shangla.
Nine people were also injured in these areas.Two houses were completely destroyed and seven partially damaged.Chief Minister Mahmood Khan has directed the administration to provide relief to the rain-affected people. In a statement in Peshawar, he directed the concerned authorities to assess damages caused by the rains.In central Pakistan, nine people were killed in three separate incidents of roofs collapsing during heavy rains, four of them in the city of Multan.Heavy seasonal rains often cause landslides and flash floods in the South Asian country.

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Pakistan to take another $1.4 bln loan to curb power sector arrears: report

ISLAMABAD: Pakistan plans to borrow another 200 billion rupees ($1.44 billion) to help clear power sector debt destabilising the finances of the government and private power producers, Reuters reported on Friday, quoting a senior official tasked with  44 billion) to help clear power sector debt destabilising the finances of the government and private power producers, Reuters reported on Friday, quoting a senior official tasked with energy reforms.
Pakistan’s economy and society have been racked by a decade of chronic electricity shortages which have crippled its manufacturing industries and stoked voter anger in the South Asian nation of 208 million people.Electricity shortages have eased in the last 12 months but years of mismanagement and funding shortfalls for subsidies have led to accumulated power sector payment arrears, or circular debt, soaring to 1.4 trillion rupees ($10.1 billion).
Independent power producers (IPPs), angry with late government payments, have warned they face a financial crisis, while economists fear rising circular debt will further widen Pakistan’s yawning fiscal deficit, a key part of ongoing bailout talks with the International Monetary Fund.Pakistan earlier this month raised 200 billion rupees through an Islamic bond to ease a financial crunch in its power sector, but critics say much more needs to be done.
Nadeem Babar, head of the Task Force on Energy Reforms created by new Prime Minister Imran Khan, told Reuters the government plans to ease financial pressures on power generation companies by taking another 200 billion rupee loan by April.That total of 400 billion will not bring the outstanding amount down to zero, but it will pay it down substantially to a point where no generator will be at risk of shutting down or having liquidity issues, Babar told Reuters on Thursday.
The loans are a key part of the government’s strategy to rethink how it deals with power arrears and will give the government breathing room to enact wide-ranging reforms, Babar added.He said Khan’s government is looking to save money by moving power sector arrears from the balance sheet of the independent power producers (IPPs) on to the balance sheet of government-owned distribution companies.
Under Pakistan’s power purchasing system, IPPs bill the government monthly for the power they produce, but when the government fails to pay up, power generators take commercial bank loans to stay afloat and the government is hit with financial penalties for late payments.In the past, to keep debt off the government’s power companies’ balance sheet, the government has allowed a run up of the same debt on IPP balance sheets – but at what cost?, said Babar, who is currently writing Pakistan’s 25-year future energy policy.
The finance minister has understood and agreed that it is nonsensical that we are paying about 3 percent higher interest rate to keep this debt off our balance sheet when we acknowledge that it is our debt, said Babar.Pakistan hiked electricity prices in January and the new tariff, set to gradually increase over the next two and half years, will drastically slow the accumulation of circular debt and will eventually help eradicate it, Babar said.
Transmission losses and theft are also being aggressively targeted by the government, he added.ISLAMABAD: Pakistan plans to borrow another 200 billion rupees ($1.44 billion) to help clear power sector debt destabilising the finances of the government and private power producers, Reuters reported on Friday, quoting a senior official tasked with energy reforms.Pakistan’s economy and society have been racked by a decade of chronic electricity shortages which have crippled its manufacturing industries and stoked voter anger in the South Asian nation of 208 million people.
Electricity shortages have eased in the last 12 months but years of mismanagement and funding shortfalls for subsidies have led to accumulated power sector payment arrears, or “circular debt”, soaring to 1.4 trillion rupees ($10.1 billion).Independent power producers (IPPs), angry with late government payments, have warned they face a financial crisis, while economists fear rising circular debt will further widen Pakistan’s yawning fiscal deficit, a key part of ongoing bailout talks with the International Monetary Fund.
Pakistan earlier this month raised 200 billion rupees through an Islamic bond to ease a financial crunch in its power sector, but critics say much more needs to be done.Nadeem Babar, head of the Task Force on Energy Reforms created by new Prime Minister Imran Khan, told Reuters the government plans to ease financial pressures on power generation companies by taking another 200 billion rupee loan by April.
“That total of 400 billion will not bring the outstanding amount down to zero, but it will pay it down substantially to a point where no generator will be at risk of shutting down or having liquidity issues,” Babar told Reuters on Thursday.The loans are a key part of the government’s strategy to rethink how it deals with power arrears and will give the government breathing room to enact wide-ranging reforms, Babar added.
He said Khan’s government is looking to save money by moving power sector arrears from the balance sheet of the independent power producers (IPPs) on to the balance sheet of government-owned distribution companies.Under Pakistan’s power purchasing system, IPPs bill the government monthly for the power they produce, but when the government fails to pay up, power generators take commercial bank loans to stay afloat and the government is hit with financial penalties for late payments.“In the past, to keep debt off the government’s power companies’ balance sheet, the government has allowed a run up of the same debt on IPP balance sheets – but at what cost?,” said Babar, who is currently writing Pakistan’s 25-year future energy policy.“The finance minister has understood and agreed that it is nonsensical that we are paying about 3 percent higher interest rate to keep this debt off our balance sheet when we acknowledge that it is our debt,” said Babar.
Pakistan hiked electricity prices in January and the new tariff, set to gradually increase over the next two and half years, will drastically slow the accumulation of circular debt and will eventually help eradicate it, Babar said.Transmission losses and theft are also being aggressively targeted by the government, he added.

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