Press "Enter" to skip to content

Posts tagged as PARIS

Cité internationale des arts

The Cité internationale des arts, is an artist-in-residence building which welcomes artists of all specialities and nationalities to Paris. It extends over …

Please follow and like us:

APR Plots Indonesian Viscose-Rayon to Take Over World Fashion

Jakarta. Asia Pacific Rayon, or APR, is one of the largest integrated producers of viscose-rayon in Asia. Asia Pacific Rayon, or APR, is one of the largest integrated producers of viscose-rayon in Asia.
The sustainably-produced fibre is commonly used in outerwearfrom casual shirts to coatsand now the company wants it to be used in haute couture as well. It also believes that the increasingly fine fabric can boost Indonesias textile exports.The company is part of global pulp giant Royal Golden Eagle, controlled by conglomerate Sukanto Tanoto, and had just opened a new plant in Pangkalan Kerinci, Riau, early this year.The Riau plant will be capable of producing 240,000 tons of viscose-rayonsoft fiber made from dissolved celluloseevery year.
On Thursday (28/03), APR showcased the results of its collaboration with eight Indonesian fashion designers who turned out high-fashion outfits using viscose-rayon as part of the 2019 Indo Intertex fashion and textile exhibition held at JIEXPO Kemayoran in East Jakarta.We use sustainable raw material and clean manufacturing to produce our viscose, Cherie Tan, APRs vice president of communications, said at the event.We track the sources of our raw material and are committed to be transparent about it. We only use dissolved pulp certified to have no deforestation links, she said.
The company hopes its fine viscose-rayon can soon be found on the catwalks of Paris, Milan and New York as part of the couture collections of many creative young designers from Indonesia trying to make it on the world stage.Indonesias textile and fashion industry has enormous potential.The government is targeting textile exports of $15 billion this year, Muhdori, the Industry Ministrys textile, leather and footwear director, said. Last years figure was $14 billion.The Indonesian Textile Association (API) estimates the value of Indonesian textile exports can reach a whopping Rp 444 trillion ($31 billion) by 2025.APR is the future of Indonesian textiles, simply because dissolved pulp is the future of the global textile industry, Muhdori said.
APRs director Basrie Kamba said locally made viscose-rayon will offer a big boost to Indonesias creative economysomething President Jokowi has been especially keen on. Until recently, Indonesia still relied on imports for the material.The designers who collaborated with us and were on show today are proof that Indonesia is more than capable of producing high-quality fashion using viscose-rayon. This textile actually gives designers a competitive advantage, Basrie said.APR plans to exports 96,000 tons of viscose-rayon this year, mostly to Turkey, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

Please follow and like us:

Your weekend arts forecast: A feast for the eyes (and ears)

Petersburg Museum of Fine Arts, A Feast For the Eyes: European Masterpieces From the Grasset Collection is an exhibition of 40 baroque-era oil paintings – brilliant, beautiful and lyrical works from the likes of 17th and 18th century masters van Dyck, Canaletto, Brueghel the Elder, de Velde and others.The masterworks are from the private collection of Juan Manuel Grasset, of Madrid, Spain. The 90-year-old art collector attended a media preview of the exhibition, accompanied by several members of the extended Grasset family, Thursday.His daughter Christina explained that the St. Pete visit is only the second time Grasset’s collection has gone on loan in the United States; indeed, it was previously at the San Diego Museum of Art,  in 2016.

Jan Davidsz. de Heem, Dutch, 1606-1683/4 Still Life of flowers in a glass vase in a stone niche, Oil on oak panel Christina Grasset detailed the collection’s backstory: “My father bought these paintings over the course of 50 years.I think there are four Spanish painters, but everything else is Dutch and Flemish. Or Italian.And so he would buy these paintings in London, or in Paris, and then bring them back to his home in Madrid.”Over the course of many years, she continued, “like any true collector, it’s very difficult for them to stop! They will see another painting, they fall in love, and they have to have it.
My parents have a fairly large home in Madrid, but we got to a point where the paintings were on the floor and stacked against the walls.“It took a very long time to convince him to part with the paintings, because they’re objects that he loves.

But we finally convinced him that they would be much better in a museum. And this is where the paintings look their best.”Frail and wheelchair-bound, but smiling and looking dapper nonetheless, Juan Manuel Grasset offered a quick compliment to the Museum of Fine Arts. “I think I never saw the collection as brilliantly displayed as it is here,” he said.The Grasset collection consists almost entirely of landscapes and still lifes of flowers, fruit bowls and laden banquet tables, along with other bounties. MFA Curator of Exhibitions and Collections Stanton Thomas asked Grasset about this.

“None of the grand traditions of Spanish portrait portraiture, or religious paintings or battle scenes appealed to him,” Thomas said. “He has almost no images of people.”Thomas – and others who’ve examined and thought deeply about the collection – developed a theory. “The thought is that these very beautiful, very lyrical, very escapist pictures might be a reflection of his youth, which was during a very difficult time,” the curator explained.“It was right after World War II, there wasn’t a lot around. These are kind of a reaction to the hardships of his youth.“There’s a beautiful logic to the paintings – people enjoying themselves out in the country, or beautiful flowers, or feasts. They would have been an enormous contrast to what people would have experienced in post-World War II Spain.”Juan Manuel Grasset, seated, talks with the media at the Museum of Fine Arts March 21. At far right is his daughter Christina.

Photo by Bill DeYoung.Thomas will conduct a Gallery Talk on the exhibition from 3 to 4 p.m. Sunday, March 24.A Feast For the Eyes: European Masterpieces From the Grasset Collection will remain at the museum through July 28.And now, thisOf course, the 2nd annual St.Petersburg Tiny Home Festival is Saturday and Sunday. Everything you need to know is here.Brad PaisleyNice cross-section of popular music this weekend, including country legend Clint Black (tonight at the Mahaffey), Chicago (or what’s left of the band that was once the mighty Chicago) at Ruth Eckerd Hall tonight, and yet another country star, Brad Paisley (Valspar Live! at the Osprey Driving Range in Palm Harbor Saturday – details here).The Palladium’s got the Boogie Woogie Blues Piano Stomp Saturday (here’s what we wrote about it) and country’s Mickey Gilley Sunday.

Please follow and like us: