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APR Plots Indonesian Viscose-Rayon to Take Over World Fashion

Jakarta. Asia Pacific Rayon, or APR, is one of the largest integrated producers of viscose-rayon in Asia. Asia Pacific Rayon, or APR, is one of the largest integrated producers of viscose-rayon in Asia.
The sustainably-produced fibre is commonly used in outerwearfrom casual shirts to coatsand now the company wants it to be used in haute couture as well. It also believes that the increasingly fine fabric can boost Indonesias textile exports.The company is part of global pulp giant Royal Golden Eagle, controlled by conglomerate Sukanto Tanoto, and had just opened a new plant in Pangkalan Kerinci, Riau, early this year.The Riau plant will be capable of producing 240,000 tons of viscose-rayonsoft fiber made from dissolved celluloseevery year.
On Thursday (28/03), APR showcased the results of its collaboration with eight Indonesian fashion designers who turned out high-fashion outfits using viscose-rayon as part of the 2019 Indo Intertex fashion and textile exhibition held at JIEXPO Kemayoran in East Jakarta.We use sustainable raw material and clean manufacturing to produce our viscose, Cherie Tan, APRs vice president of communications, said at the event.We track the sources of our raw material and are committed to be transparent about it. We only use dissolved pulp certified to have no deforestation links, she said.
The company hopes its fine viscose-rayon can soon be found on the catwalks of Paris, Milan and New York as part of the couture collections of many creative young designers from Indonesia trying to make it on the world stage.Indonesias textile and fashion industry has enormous potential.The government is targeting textile exports of $15 billion this year, Muhdori, the Industry Ministrys textile, leather and footwear director, said. Last years figure was $14 billion.The Indonesian Textile Association (API) estimates the value of Indonesian textile exports can reach a whopping Rp 444 trillion ($31 billion) by 2025.APR is the future of Indonesian textiles, simply because dissolved pulp is the future of the global textile industry, Muhdori said.
APRs director Basrie Kamba said locally made viscose-rayon will offer a big boost to Indonesias creative economysomething President Jokowi has been especially keen on. Until recently, Indonesia still relied on imports for the material.The designers who collaborated with us and were on show today are proof that Indonesia is more than capable of producing high-quality fashion using viscose-rayon. This textile actually gives designers a competitive advantage, Basrie said.APR plans to exports 96,000 tons of viscose-rayon this year, mostly to Turkey, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

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Guide to Freedom

The Lewis Center for the Arts’ Program in Visual Arts in collaboration with Princeton Garden Theatre presents a screening of the documentary.Tickets are available through the Garden Theatre box office and website and are free to Princeton University students, faculty and staff with Princeton ID.
“The Negro Motorist Green Book.” In the 1930s, Green, a black postal carrier from Harlem, began publishing this annual guide in the era of Jim Crow laws, when open and often legally prescribed discrimination against African Americans and other non-whites was widespread. These travelers, often journeying by automobile to avoid other discriminatory practices on public transportation, faced a variety of dangers and inconveniences along the road, from refusal of food and lodging to arbitrary arrest.
In response, Green wrote his guide to services and places relatively friendly to African Americans, eventually expanding its coverage from the New York area to much of North America. The film explores some of the segregated nation’s safe havens and notorious “sundown towns” and relates stories of struggle and indignity as well as opportunity and triumph.The 2019 Academy Award-winning film Green Book is also a reference to Green’s publication.Andrew Ricketts of BET (Black Entertainment Television) notes, “The Green Book: Guide to Freedom is a timely film on Green’s handbook of the same name.
His guide listed over 9,500 venues where Black vacationers were welcome. But it’s only an afterthought in the fictional film that bears its title.Although that film won Best Picture and Best Supporting Actor, it glosses over the significance of “The Green Book” in favor of narrowing the focus to the prevalence of White ignorance. That curious omission makes the origin story of “The Green Book” even more crucial.Director Yoruba Richen reveals it in a documentary that is equal parts proud and tragic.”

New York Public LibraryYoruba Richen, the film’s writer/director, is a documentary filmmaker whose work has been featured on PBS, New York Times Op Doc, Frontline Digital, New York Magazine’s The Cut, The Atlantic, and Field of Vision.Her feature documentary, The New Black won multiple festival awards and was nominated for an NAACP Image Award and a GLAAD Media Award. Her previous film Promised Land, won the Fledgling Fund award for social issue documentary, and she won a Clio award for her short film about the Grammy-nominated singer Andra Day.

She has also won the Creative Promise Award at Tribeca All Access and was a Sundance Producers Fellow. Richen is a Fulbright fellow, a Guggenheim fellow and a 2016 recipient of the Chicken Egg Breakthrough Filmmaker Award.She was chosen for The Root 100 list of the most influential African Americans 45 and under, recognizing her as a leader whose “work from the past year is breaking down barriers and paving the way for the next generation.” She is a lecturer and director of the documentary program at the City University of New York’s Craig Newmark Graduate School of Journalism.Su Friedrich has produced and directed twenty-three 16mm films and digital videos, and with one exception is the writer, director, cinematographer, sound recordist and editor of all her films. Friedrichs films have won many awards, including the Best Narrative Film Award at the Athens International Film Festival, the Outstanding Documentary Feature at Outfest in Los Angeles, the Special Jury Award at the New York Gay Lesbian Film Festival, the Grand Prix at the Melbourne Film Festival, the Golden Gate Award at the San Francisco Film Festival, and the Best Experimental Narrative Award at the Atlanta Film Festival.
Her work is widely screened in the United States, Canada and Europe and has been the subject of retrospectives at the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the Rotterdam International Film Festival, The London Lesbian and Gay Film Festival, The Stadtkino in Vienna, the Pacific Cinematheque in Vancouver, and the National Film Theater in London. In 2016, her film Sink or Swim (1990) was selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry of The Library of Congress.Her work is in the collection of the Museum of Modern Art, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Royal Film Archive of Belgium, the Centre Pompidou in Paris, the National Library of Australia, as well as many university libraries.Princeton Garden Theatre maintains an ongoing collaborative relationship with the Lewis Center for the Arts and other departments throughout the University.The theater presents independent, foreign, and classic films and special film-related programming and in 2017 was named by NJ.com as The Best Movie Theater in New Jersey.To learn more about this event, the Program in Visual Arts, and the more than 100 other performances, exhibitions, readings, screenings and lectures presented each year at the Lewis Center visit arts.

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Arts center apologizes for calling off discussion panel on ‘Miss Saigon’

A Wisconsin arts center apologized Thursday for canceling a discussion panel about “Miss Saigon” hours before it was to take place.“First and foremost, we apologize for postponing last night’s event,” Ed Holmes, senior vice president for equity and innovation at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison, said in a statement.“That was a mistake.”Holmes said the center canceled the panel out of concern that it was “becoming more of a lecture than a dialogue.”

New York: Miss Saigon returns to Broadway with bright, young Star.The panel, called “Asian American Perspectives on ‘Miss Saigon’: Stereotypes, History and Community,” was called to discuss long-standing issues surrounding the musical. The center said it would reschedule the event.”Miss Saigon,” about a young Vietnamese woman orphaned during the Vietnam War who has a child with an American soldier, has been a source of limited work for Asian-American performers, often allowing them to work on other projects. But it also has been criticized for its white-savior narrative, its portrayal of Asian women as sexual objects and as needing to be “saved,” and the emasculation and dehumanization of Asian men.

“We had said that education was really important in contextualizing the play so when people go to see it they have a sense of this history and they understand why Asian Americans have organized to protest it in the past,” Lori Lopez, an associate professor of Asian-American studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison who helped organize the panel, said by phone.The panelists and moderator scheduled to participate in the panel included professors from Asian-American studies programs at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Minnesota, a speaker from a local nonprofit, and an official from the Overture Center, where a touring version of “Miss Saigon” is scheduled to perform April 2 to 7.

“We’re scholars. We give talks all the time.This is the kind of conversation we’re really used to hosting,” Lopez said of the event cancellation. “We were upset because we had put so much work into it.”Several panel organizers decided to host a “teach-in” about the musical outside the center Wednesday night.After the “teach-in” was announced, the Overture Center offered the speakers the use of a space, which the speakers declined.Holmes said in the statement that the center has reinvited the panelists for an event scheduled to take place on April 24, after the show’s run in Madison.

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These real estate heavyweights were invited to Cuomo’s secretive fundraiser

Developer Douglas Durst and billionaire John Castimatidis were among the bigwigs invited to Gov.Andrew Cuomo’s secretive fundraiser earlier this month.
Durst, chairman of the Durst Organization, donated but didn’t attend the event, which was held at the St. Regis Hotel, the New York Times reported.The minimum donation per couple was $25,000.Catsimatidis said he did not contribute or go to the event — and said he was invited because of his longtime friendship with the governor.“I go back with the governor 20 years,” he told the Times.“In 50 years in business, I have never gotten anything from the city or the state, the Red Apple Group head told the Times.“You know what I’ve gotten? Ungatz. That’s Italian, I think.””Other real estate figures who received invites included Island Capital Groups Andrew Farkas and Atlantic Development Groups Peter Fine, according to the Times.The dinner was kept under the radar and not listed on Cuomo’s calendar.The invitation, too, was vaguely worded, the report said.The pricey fundraiser was planned as the New York State budget comes due — and lobbyists advised clients that the event would be good for them to attend.
Guests included senior Cuomo administration officials, including the state budget director Robert Mujica.Cuomo gave a speech to a room of about 100 people, talking about Amazon, the tumult in Washington and the transition from campaigning to governing.Two months earlier, Cuomo promised to work on campaign finance reform. He signed new limitations on corporate donations and he has vowed to “combat big money in politics.” The governor has been a big fundraiser himself, with the vast portion of his political donations coming from big checks.Last year, he accumulated more than $30 million in his campaign war chest, before a pricey effort to fend off a primary challenge from Cynthia Nixon.

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When we travel faster, what do we lose?

This is the marketing language on the web site for Boom Supersonic, a jet developer creating a plane that will travel at twice the speed of sound and The question Boom asks strikes me as surprisingly poignant, although perhaps not quite in the way it’s intended.
Contemplating the query as I slowly paddle a wooden board across the Sarasota Bay, water lapping at my ankles, going nowhere in particular as birds fly by and dolphins swim alongside my old-timey conveyance, it sounds accidentally profound, even downright philosophical. It’s practically a Zen koan, like “what is the sound of one hand clapping?” This is the kind of riddle you might mull a lifetime it’s so rich.Think on it and you may attain enlightenment, going beyond conscious thought altogether.Boom’s query is so good because it’s deceptively simple yet leaves so much to deconstruct.
Considering its parts only raises more questions. Here are just a few: What is time? What’s half of that? And what is the point of travel? Is it destinations or the path? Or is it actually getting back home? And is this new airplane the innovation we need, societally or individually, practically or philosophically?Securing a seatBlake Scholl, the founder of Boom, foresees a future where we’re practically teleporting from one continent to the next, when distance and time are barely related and we’re liberated from physical constraints.“Imagine crossing the Atlantic, conducting business, and being home in time to tuck your kids into bed,” the company website suggests. “Leave DC at 6:00 AM and make a 3:30 PM meeting in central London.Take your clients out to dinner and still be back in DC by 7:30pm local.”Airlines are betting that Scholl is onto something.
Boom has received substantial investments from both Virgin Atlantic and Japan Airlines. If all goes according to plan, Boom expects to break the sound barrier with an experimental jet this year; by 2025 the business should be fully operational, supplying airlines with commercial planes that will change our relationship to time and space.
If Boom and competing supersonic plane developers—like Boeing, Spike Aerospace, and Aerion Supersonic—have their way, business people will someday be able to pack even more busy-ness into over-scheduled lives. But I’m exhausted just mulling this task-filled futuristic day on two continents.Is spending the night in a hotel in London really that bad? To me, this emphasis on speed seems anything but luxurious. I’m uncertain that supersonic travel will actually improve the quality of life of those who’ll be able to afford this rapid transport.
To me, this emphasis on speed seems anything but luxurious.This, of course, leads to another question.While Scholl says that speed will help bring people across cultures closer, it’s worth noting that it’s also quite likely to increase the experiential distance between the rich and everyone else. Securing a spot on a speedy 55-seat Boom jet—where all passengers get both an aisle and window seat—will cost the price of a business class ticket on a classic airplane, the company predicts.That’s cheaper than a ticket on the Concorde, the supersonic jet that stopped operation in 2003 and cost nearly $11,000 for a roundtrip between New York and London.But Boom’s prices aren’t as affordable as a typical coach seat today.
So whatever advantages speedier travel brings, they won’t be available to everyone, and certainly not immediately, which means the world will only get more accessible for a tiny percentage of people.Faster than the speed of sound Perhaps more important than affordability and practicalities, though, are the abstract questions raised by supersonic flight.
For example, what is lost when time is gained?Getting anywhere is rarely anyone’s favorite part of a trip. Literally and metaphorically, humans tend to relish the destination over the path, viewing the journey as an inconvenience to be suffered for some ultimate result: arrival.
And Boom is planning to capitalize on that human tendency. Its website urges readers to contemplate how great it will be when everyone’s zipping around the world at top speed.No relationship will have to be long distance anymore, far-off colleagues will become familiar faces, and it will be standard to hop on a plane to Asia from the US and back, all before the jet lag even sets in.If time is money, then being extravagant about the hours is a luxury, and being in a hurry is perhaps a kind of existential stinginess.
But maybe there’s also something to be said for journeys that reflect the distances we travel, for pacing and rhythm. Distorting the relationship between miles and time doesn’t always improve our experience.
After all, if time is money, then being extravagant about the hours is a luxury, and being in a hurry is perhaps a kind of existential stinginess.We know from countless books, movies, and songs, that there’s adventure found in between places and that getting there can be as central to a story as a destination.Take Caity Weaver’s recent journey from New York to Los Angeles by train, which she documented in a New York Times Magazine story. Weaver paid about ten times as much as a plane ticket for her Amtrak rail adventure, and it took ten times as long as a flight.
Yet it was precisely the inefficiency that appealed to the writer, the path, the slowness, the space for contemplation that she savored. Weaver writes:Scale on a rail trip is what’s most arresting. An extended train ride affords a chance not just to see a horizon but also to soak it up.To luxuriate in the far-off for uninterrupted hours. To exist, briefly, in the uncharted sections of the cellphone-coverage map.
And it feels as if you’re getting away with something—seeing more than you deserve.For Weaver, taking the time to stare at endless horizons feels almost deliciously criminal because it’s so rare.
As Jack Kerouac writes in the early pages of his classic travel novel On the Road, “Somewhere along the line I knew there’d be girls, visions, everything; somewhere along the line the pearl would be handed to me.”The Boom worldview suggests that the pearl—whatever treasure it is we seek when we leave home—is in a specific place and that the faster you get there, the better.The Kerouac perspective is that the adventure, the journey, the road itself, will yield treasures, and that destinations are secondary.In fact, the pearl might be found anywhere, on the journey, or upon arrival, maybe when you return home.
We may soon travel fast but that doesn’t mean slow paths are without value.Higher, faster—better?Scholl believes that Boom’s planes will go higher, faster, and better than any commercial airplanes ever have.He’s personally and professionally excited by the possibilities. “Supersonic is all about getting there faster and changing what you can do in a day,” he says on a recent episode of the podcast Should This Exist?But Boom has some technical and legal obstacles to overcome if this transformation is to occur.For one thing, many countries—including the US—don’t allow supersonic flight in their airspaces because of concerns about the effects of the loud, disruptive sounds the planes make. So even if Scholl gets Boom’s jets operational, they may have to fly at subsonic speeds in certain areas to comply with current regulations.
Boom argues on its site that in the long term, however, supersonic flight bans should “be reversed and replaced with a commonsense noise standard, set to promote efficient, affordable supersonic flight while disallowing nuisance.” It contends that its jets will make 30 times less noise than the Concorde did when breaking the sound barrier and that the dangers created by exposure to sonic booms are commonly exaggerated.The company also has to deal with heightened environmental concerns, although Boom claims that its planes will have the same fuel consumption and emissions profiles as classic subsonic jets with business class capacity and that high speed travel can be green. It plans to work with scientists and technologists to ensure the sustainability of supersonic travel, according to its website FAQ.
But given the many pressing transportation problems facing the world, is speeding up air travel even the best use of our precious intellectual and financial resources? “I look at the brilliance that it would probably take to create something like this and and part of me mourns for the problems that these people won’t be thinking about while they’re raising six billion dollars to create a 55-seat airplane that will essentially make it a little more painless for people whose lives are already painless to fly around the world,” says writer and editor Anand Girdharadas the episode of Should This Exist? Giridharadas wonders what those big thinkers could do with big budgets if tasked with solving big, pressing, serious issues, like addressing climate change.Giridharadas has a point.
It’s definitely worth reflecting on what value supersonic travel has and what it might do to humanity, now, while we still have the time. The steady march of technology has ensured that the pace of our lives has increased, too, just as relentlessly.And we might well be right to resist. Harried as we already are, exhausted by extensive use of tools designed to make our lives more efficient, it’s only natural and correct to ask if traveling faster to get more done in a day is really such a desirable goal.
But if transportation history is any indication, people will ultimately embrace this innovation and the world will change as a result. Before too long it could be common for passengers to drink champagne on a supersonic jet high above the Earth, toasting human ingenuity while hurtling faster than the speed of sound.Should This Exist? is a podcast, hosted by Caterina Fake, that debates how emerging technologies will impact humanity. for a more in-depth conversation on evaluating the human side of technology.

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Albany reconsiders pied-à-terre tax, could tax real estate sales instead

The state is now considering a tax increase on real estate transactions instead, Politico reported, citing five sources close to the negotiations.One source said the pied-a-terre proposal isn’t dead yet but is “headed there.” Its not immediately clear what a change in real estate taxes would look like.Gov.
Andrew Cuomo continued to push for the pied-à-terre tax in a radio interview on Monday morning, but the tide appeared to have turned by Monday afternoon.Another source told Politico that the tax proved to be too “onerous,” and would further complicate New York Citys already convoluted property tax system.
A recurring topic in city and state politics, the idea of a pied-à-terre tax was put forward again this month as a way to fund the MTA, as it became clear that a plan to legalize and tax marijuana would not come together in time. Albany lawmakers already agreed to a congestion pricing plan on Monday, with revenues earmarked for MTA repairsThe pied-a-terre proposal was poorly received in the real estate world, with the Real Estate Board of New Yorks John Banks saying it would throw a huge wet blanket over the entire industry.

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En Garde Arts Names Heather Cohn Executive Director

NEW YORK CITY: En Garde Arts has named Heather Cohn to be its new executive director. Cohn will join founder and artistic director Anne Hamburger in leading En Garde’s artistic and fiscal planning process, fundraising, community engagement, and board relations.

Heather Cohn.“I’m thrilled that Heather is moving into this new leadership position at such a pivotal moment for our company,” said Hamburger in a statement.
“With her deep fundraising experience, organizational management skills, and commitment to artistry and community, she’s the ideal partner with whom to build a vital and sustainable future for En Garde Arts.”Cohn previously served as the company’s development and community engagement director.Before joining En Garde Arts, she served as the director of development for Epic Theatre Ensemble for four years. She’s also worked with Disney Theatrical, New York Theatre Workshop, the Pearl Theatre Company, and Theatre Communications Group.

Cohn is a co-founder and producing director of the Off-Off-Broadway company Flux Theatre Ensemble, where she has produced 28 full productions, including 17 world premieres. She has directed nine Flux productions, with playwrights including Gus Schulenburg, Erin Browne, Kristen Palmer, Kevin R.Free, and Johnna Adams. She served as assistant director to Austin Pendleton on Johnna Adams’s Gidion’s Knot.She has also directed with companies including Rattlestick, Lark Play Development Center, Cherry Lane, the EstroGenius Festival, and Planet Connections. She is a board member of the League of Professional Theatre Women (LPTW) and serves as co-chair on the Task Force for trans inclusion.

She was a member of the Producers’ LAB with WP Theatre and is a graduate of Vassar College, where she majored in Latin American Studies and spent time living in Cuba and Chile.“I’m so grateful to Annie and the board for entrusting me with the opportunity to build on the extraordinary legacy of En Garde Arts,” said Cohn in a statement.“Together, we will advance our mission to create, produce, and present bold theatre experiences that reach across artistic, physical, and social boundaries.”

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Ethiopian Airlines says its relationship with Boeing will last “well into the future”

CEO Tewolde GebreMariam said the company will work with the US manufacturer and other airlines to “make air travel even safer” and SOLIDARITYE thiopian Airlines says its relationship with Boeing will last “well into the future”By Abdi Latif DahirMarch 25, 2019Ethiopian Airlines has said it has confidence in Boeing, a singular vote of confidence that comes as both companies face increasing questions following a deadly crash in early March.

In a statement today (March 25), CEO Tewolde GebreMariam said the company will work with the US manufacturer and other airlines to “make air travel even safer” and to “make the skies safer for the world.”Boeing is facing scrutiny and government probes after two fatal crashes involving its 737 Max 8 model aircraft occurred within months of each other in Indonesia and Ethiopia, leading to their grounding worldwide.Although the causes of the crashes are yet to be determined, questions have swirled around the plane’s automated system designed to direct the nose downwards if it was in danger of stalling.Transport officials in Addis Ababa have said there were “clear similarities” between the Ethiopian and Lion Air crashes in Indonesia.

Both planes flew with erratic altitude changes and crashed minutes after takeoff while trying to return to the airport.The Chicago-headquartered planemaker is the key supplier to Ethiopian, with the partnership between the two extending to the early 1960s.The ET 302 flight plane that crashed was less than five months old, and Tewolde said they took delivery of yet another 737 Boeing cargo planes of a different model less than a month ago.Tewolde also extolled Ethiopian’s relationship with the US aviation industry, saying their earlier pilots, crew, and mechanics were employees of the now-defunct New York-based airline, TWA.

Ethiopian Airlines was originally established after a visiting Ethiopian delegation requested American officials in 1945 to help establish a commercial airline for domestic air service.“Let me be clear: Ethiopian Airlines believes in Boeing,” Tewolde said.“Despite the tragedy, Boeing and Ethiopian Airlines will continue to be linked well into the future.”Ethiopian Airlines’ renewed pledge to Boeing comes as the state carrier itself fends off allegations that it sacrificed expansion and profit for safety.The carrier is Africa’s fastest-growing with hubs across the continent and a 113-strong fleet servicing 119 destinations worldwide.A New York Times story last week reported that even though the airline had the 737 Max 8 simulator, the pilot on the ill-fated flight was yet to be trained on it.

A Washington Post report also found 2015 complaints in the US Federal Aviation Administration database from pilots who accused the airline of failing to update manuals and for instituting a “fear-based” management style.Ethiopian refuted both stories and even called on the Post to “remove the article, apologize and correct the facts.”When the Boeing 737 Max 8 was first introduced, Boeing and the FAA agreed pilots who had flown a related earlier 737 model didn’t need additional simulator training, nor training specifically about the automated system known as MCAS. Pilots qualified to fly the 737-800 only received training that amounted to “an iPad lesson for an hour.” Pilot unions have said that since the Lion Air crash, they have received formal instruction on the feature.Tewolde said in his statement their pilots “who fly the new model were trained on all appropriate simulators”—but still didn’t confirm whether the specific pilots on the doomed ET 302 trained on the simulator.Boeing currently continues to face the bulk of criticism especially after revelations that it charged extrawould add as standard feature following the crashes. And despite the expression of confidence, there seems to be a chance of fissure between Ethiopian and Boeing as investigations continue.In the aftermath of the Lion Air crash, “more should have been done from the Boeing side in terms of disclosure, in terms of coming up with strong procedures, stronger than what they gave us,” Tewolde told the Wall Street Journal today.

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