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Most Controversial Fashion Choices Made By the Royal Family

Prominent members of the British royal family have become pillars for fashion trends, especially the younger generation.But with a set royal dress code they are supposed to follow, its no surprise they get it wrong sometimes and raise eyebrows in the process.
From Kate Middletons fly-away skirt to Prince Harrys bad costume choice, heres a look at 15 of the most controversial fashion choices
Next: Last but not least 15. Kates repeat ensemblePrince William, Duke of Cambridge and Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge arrive at Los Angeles | Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)Constantly having eyes on what youre wearing means sporting a new ensemble every time you step in front of the camera.
But Duchess Catherine has bucked that trend by sporting the same lilac Roksanda dress on multiple occasions. Not only does the dress look great on her, but it shows that even royal have favorite pieces they like to wear on repeat regardless of what the royal fashion rules are.
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Big Tobacco’s push for Big Vape

Citizens’ initiative calls for vaping to be treated differently from traditional smoking – and is backed by industry associations.
By Katie Jennings2/26/19, 7:58 PM CET2/27/19, 10:01 AM CETAll major tobacco companies are moving into vaping | Niklas Hallen/AFP via Getty ImagesAll major tobacco companies are moving into vaping | Niklas Hallen/AFP via Getty ImagesLinkedInWhatsAppCommentPrintBig Tobacco has a new lobbying tactic in Brussels — people power.
A petition calling for vaping products to be treated differently from tobacco was this month registered with the European Commission, using a process that’s designed to give the public a say in decision-making.However, the campaign received a €10,000 contribution from U.K.-based Imperial Brands, one of the world’s largest tobacco companies, and the individuals listed on the application include Imperial’s head of EU corporate affairs and representatives from national vaping industry lobbies.
As EU rules put the squeeze on cigarette sales, tobacco companies are expanding into vaping products and the industry is making huge efforts to ensure they avoid the regulatory fate of traditional smoking.The petition, which calls for looser controls on vaping products by having them treated separately from tobacco products, is part of that drive.Under the rules of the European Citizens’ Initiative process, the petition’s organizers have a year to collect 1 million signatures from at least seven EU countries. If that happens, the Commission must consider their request (although it can reject it).
The involvement of individuals with direct ties to the tobacco and vaping industries “reduces the [citizens’ initiative] tool to absurdity” — Olivier Hoedeman, researcher The Commission declined to name those behind the initiative — called “Let’s demand smarter vaping regulation” — when it was announced on February 12.But the subsequent registration listed Dustin Dahlmann and Mosè Giacomello, representatives of the German and Italian vaping industry associations, and Valerio Forconi, head of EU corporate affairs and a registered lobbyist for Imperial Brands.Also On Politico  Amsterdams Brexit bonanza Naomi OLearyAlso On PoliticoCancer and corruption: In Romania, its the same fightSarah Wheaton Forconi said Imperial is supporting grassroots activism by funding the campaign, and the individuals that registered the initiative said they are acting in a personal capacity.However, a corporate watchdog group called the petition an “abuse” of the system.
Tobacco companies are taking a different approach toward regulators with e-cigarettes than they did with traditional cigarettes | Fabrice Coffrini/AFP via Getty Images“Imperial Brands has vested commercial interests in getting vaping products excluded from the Tobacco Products Directive and is abusing a democratic tool for citizen participation,” he said.Imperial Brands (which used to be Imperial Tobacco Group and sells Gauloises cigarettes and Montecristo cigars) expanded into vaping through its subsidiary Fontem Ventures, which makes the brand Blu.
The U.S.and U.K.are its two biggest markets, and the company has also introduced the products in France, Germany and Italy.The petition argues the Commission needs to come up with a vaping policy that ensures “access to tobacco-free less harmful alternatives,” through “bespoke, evidence-based legislation” that takes vaping products away from the shadow of Big Tobacco.
A Commission spokesperson said that while companies cannot launch citizens’ initiatives, there is nothing in the rules to prohibit employees doing so in a personal capacity.Organizations “can promote or support initiatives provided that they do so with full transparency,” the Commission said.Flipping the playbook From the 1950s onward, tobacco companies worked to emphasize scientific uncertainty and downplay links between smoking and lung cancer, and nicotine and addiction.With vaping they are flipping the playbook.
All major tobacco companies are moving into vaping, including Altria (parent company of Philip Morris), British American Tobacco and Japan International Tobacco. In tandem with vaping industry associations, tobacco companies are relying on public health arguments to make the case that electronic cigarettes are “less harmful” than traditional ones.
“What [tobacco companies] were doing in the past was saying that there was no real evidence. In fact, it’s almost .
turning on its head at the minute,” said Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine.“We want to reduce the health impact of tobacco by encouraging smokers to switch to products with lower health risks like vaping ones” — Valerio Forconi, head of EU corporate affairs at Imperial BrandsVaping devices contain nicotine but not tobacco, heating a tank of liquid containing the addictive chemical to create a vapor that can be inhaled.
The EU cracked down on both tobacco and nicotine products as part of the 2014 Tobacco Products Directive, which limited the size and strength of e-cigarette tanks, restricted advertising and set rules on packaging.The Commission is scheduled to review the directive before May 2021.One of the aims of the citizens’ initiative is to repeal Article 20 of the Tobacco Products Directive, which outlines the regulations on vaping products, and have them dealt with under separate rules.“We want to reduce the health impact of tobacco by encouraging smokers to switch to products with lower health risks like vaping ones.
We support proportionate evidence-based regulation that encourages smokers to use alternative products that have the potential for reduced harm,” Forconi said.Several scientific studies have found vaping to be less harmful than traditional smoking.While England’s public health body has strongly endorsed e-cigarettes to reduce health harm, other researchers and officials, including European Health Commissioner Vytenis Andriukaitis, are urging caution.European Commissioner for Health Vytenis Andriukaitis | John Thys/AFP via Getty ImagesThe industry bolsters its argument by citing a 2015 review by Public Health England that found e-cigarettes are “around 95 percent safer” than traditional cigarettes.
“That figure has no credibility whatsoever,” said McKee, who co-authored a commentary in medical journal The BMJ challenging the methodology of the national health body’s review. “England is completely out of line with the rest of the world,” he said.Australia and Singapore have banned e-cigarettes and the U.S.is cracking down on flavored products, saying they appeal to kids.Vaping may not bring the same risk of lung cancer as smoking “but there are serious questions about cardiovascular disease and there are enough questions there that I think the precautionary principle should be adopted,” McKee said.An alternative, McKee said, would be to regulate e-cigarettes as a medicine, if there is evidence to show they could get people off nicotine completely.“I see no justification for rolling them out as consumer goods, that’s a completely different ballpark,” McKee said.Industry opposes this route, since it would mean much stricter regulatory scrutiny. The petition states that vaping should be considered separately from pharmaceutical products.‘Time is money’Imperial’s €10,000 has gone toward building a website on which people can add their signature to the petition, and which is expected to launch in a few weeks, according to Brandon Mitchener, a managing partner for consultancy Instinctif Partners, based in Brussels.The tobacco company contracted the consultancy to provide “monitoring and strategic advice on a number of issues but mainly related to vaping,” according to Imperial’s Forconi.
That contract was worth between €50,000 and €99,000 in 2018, according to an entry in the EU’s transparency registerImperial spent more than £700 million investing in next generation products through 2018, according to a company report.“Time is money and everyone is contributing a significant amount of time to ensure the success of this initiative” — Dustin Dahlmann and Mosè Giacomello, vaping association representativesForconi said it is “hard to predict” how much money Imperial would spend promoting the petition, adding the campaign “will mainly run through social media instead of using the traditional communication touchpoints.”Giacomello and Dahlmann, who represent national vaping industry associations in Italy and Germany, said they expect their associations and others from Ireland, the United Kingdom, Czech Republic and France “will contribute to the campaign according to [their] individual means.” “Time is money and everyone is contributing a significant amount of time to ensure the success of this initiative,” Giacomello and Dahlmann said in a joint statement, adding that their associations’ investments would likely be more than €10,000, and would meet the EU’s transparency requirements.Andriukaitis’ office declined to comment on the petition or the involvement of the tobacco and vaping industries. The health commissioner has previously said e-cigarettes should be included in smoke-free legislation, and branded the argument that e-cigarettes should be freed from regulation because they help people quit smoking as “ridiculous.
”This article is part of POLITICO for a complimentary trial.

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Gross or Savvy? Theresa May’s mouldy food confession shocks Britain

The 62-year-old delved into her eating habits this week during a cabinet meeting on food waste where she offered up a controversial piece of advice.
Source: Getty British Prime Minister Teresa May has shocked residents across the UK with a mouldy food confession that has left people cringing.
Not wanting to waste seemingly good food, May claimed instead of dumping a jar of jam in the bin when it has gone off she simply scrapes away the mouldy part on top and continues to eat what’s underneath, BBC reports.The prime minister explained to the cabinet that the rest of the jam is “perfectly edible” and that it’s not always the best idea to follow use by dates as they can sometimes be incorrect, leading to more wasted food.Her admission has shocked many Brits who have questioned her habits labelling her decisions “disgusting” and contemplating how the jam went mouldy in the first place.“If she actually does scrape the mould off the top of the jam, she is disgusting,” one person wrote on .“Take you own jar next time the prime minister invites you over for afternoon tea,” another joked. While a third said: “If you jar the jam properly you don’t get mould.”

However, there have been others who claim May’s technique is actually quite savvy and prevents an abundance of food waste and money down the drain.For those born in the post war generation in particular, wasting food was very much frowned upon.
It was not uncommon to simply cut off a mouldy piece of cheese or ditch a slice of mouldy bread and keep the rest.That is the argument that some put forward when hearing of May’s food waste preventative measure.“What is she supposed to do? Eat it? Or throw away an otherwise good jar of jam? Having grown up with little money, I was taught to do the same. Wasting food is wrong,” someone argued.Never thought Id say this, but: bravo Theresa May!If people were willing to scrape the mould out of jam there wouldnt be any need for foodbanks.until, of course, brexit harms the poor, whom I care about very deeply.
February 13, 2019A second praised the prime minister adding:  “Never thought I’d say this, but: bravo Theresa May! If people were willing to scrape the mould out of jam there wouldn’t be any need for foodbanks… until of course, Brexit harms the poor, whom I care about very deeply”.Another claimed there is absolutely nothing wrong with what May does, and eating the mould itself wouldn’t even be a bad idea.
“I work for a jam manufacturer,” they said. “Simple fact is that most fruit jams are naturally acidic, and therefore the mould is likely harmless.
”It turns out they’re correct too as mould expert Dr Patrick Hickey previously told the BBC that jam that has developed mould on top is safe to eat as long as you scrape it off and ensure there is none left in the jar. This is because the high acidity levels in the fruit help keep harmful bacteria at bay.

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