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Posts tagged as England

Seton Hill University’s Harlan Gallery Hosts “Sister Wendy Beckett: Envisioning Art”

Seton Hill University’s Harlan Gallery will host “Sister Wendy Beckett: Envisioning Art” – an exhibit curated by Graham Shearing. The show will be held from March 21 through April 16 at Harlan Gallery, located in the Seton Hill Arts Center, 205 West Otterman St.Greensburg. An opening reception will be held on March 21 from 4 to 6 p.m. The reception and show are free and open to the public.
Noted Pittsburgh art dealer and art critic Graham Shearing, who curated the show, describes it as follows:How did a nun capture the imagination of the public simply through an enthusiastic contemplation of art? And through the unlikely medium of television? This exhibition suggests that she found the spiritual not only in religious art, but in other, unlikely sources.Here, a collection of art from public and private collections, and the work of living artists, reveals diverse visions of the spiritual.
This may require hard looking, which was the practice of this nun, following the precept of the Victorian critic, John Ruskin: To see clearly,’ he observed, is poetry, prophecy, and religion, all in one.’Sister Wendy died late last year in a convent in England, but the shock in a full black habit standing purposefully in front of a canvas by Mark Rothko, in a video here, hopefully will give visitors pause for thought, and keep her memory alive.
Looking at art is an exercise in divination: an exercise open to all. Take the rough with the smooth.If you are a member of the media and would like more information, contact Director of Media Relations Jennifer Reeger at , (724) 830-1069 (office) or (724) 433-9613 (cell). If you are not a member of the media, contact us.

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Agriculture / Food

Policy Manager (Agriculture / Food) Our client represents the interests of farmers and growers across England and Wales. Promoting the interests of …

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England seek T20I balm for humbling Caribbean tour

Each time England have have looked to establish their credentials as one of the powerhouses in international cricket, making them strong contenders to clinch their maiden World Cup, they have been brought down to earth by a spirited Windies team.

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People Tree work with BBC Earth to educate the general public.

As part of a wider outreach to address the impact of the fashion industry on the planet, they have collaborated with People Tree on a collection of  BBC Earth, which is part of the BBC Natural History Unit, is one of the largest documentary production houses in the world.
Their recent collaboration with Ocean X for Our Blue Planet started a global conversation about our oceans which has reached over 200 million people worldwide. A similar campaign highlighting the effects of the fashion industry could be just as far reaching.The channel is increasingly proactive in a mission to unveil the devastating consequences our desires for convenience and consumption are having on our habitat.During London Fashion Week, BBC Earth launched its #SustainableME campaign in a partnership with Amy Powney of fashion brand Mother of Pearl.
Their short film Can Fashion Be Sustainable? reminds us how fast fashion and our daily clothing consumption is threatening the biodiversity of the planet.Julia Kenyon, Global Brand Director for BBC Earth said: “In launching Sustainable Me we wanted to show people how the choices they make as consumers can shape the future of our planet.The way we currently manufacture and consume clothes places our oceans under pressure but we can be a part of the change by being more mindful in the way that we consume.”The People Tree collaboration is in tune with the #SustainableME-pledge: consider every purchase; avoid fast fashion; repair and repurpose; buy quality and consume less.

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Brunt, Wyatt help England seal tense win against India women

MUMBAI: In a tale of two lower-order fightbacks, England prevailed by two wickets to pocket their first championship points on their tour of India.
On a comeback after missing the World T20 late last year, Katherine Brunt’s incisions resulted in India losing 6 for 21 at one stage, slipping from a comfortable 129 for 1.
Brunt took four of those wickets in the course of a four-over second spell, having already dismissed the opener Jemimah Rodrigues with the new ball.Of her wickets, Smriti Mandhana’s may have been a touch lucky, the India vice-captain pulling a long-hop straight to deep midwicket for 66, the highest score of India’s innings.
Punam Raut, also on a comeback, made 56 before Brunt bowled her with an in-ducker.It took a stodgy 47-run stand between Shikha Pandey and Deepti Sharma to lift them to 205 for 8.Brunt finished with 5 for 28.In the final ODI too, there was the familiar early collapse, this time against the seam of Jhulan Goswami, who sent back the top three as England slipped to 49 for 5.
Wyatt walked in at No. 7 and immediately made run accumulation look easy, leaving her imprint on the tour after sitting out the first two ODIs.
Picked only because of an injury to Sophie Ecclestone, Wyatt milked runs steadily to make an 82-ball 56, along the way adding 69 with her captain Knight.Elwiss went on to see the chase home and remained unbeaten on 33.Brunt, who would have liked to cool off after an intense spell, made 18 crucial runs to take England to within two runs of victory. Anya Shrubsole then walloped a boundary to complete the formalities.
Scores: England women 208 for 8 (Wyatt 56, Knight 47, Elwiss 33*, Goswami 3-41, Pandey 2-34) beat India women 205 for 8 (Mandhana 66, Raut 56, Brunt 5-28) by two wickets. For the hosts, this was another trophy in the bag, allowing them to build on their ODI success in New Zealand.On a comeback after missing the World T20 late last year, Katherine Brunt’s incisions resulted in India losing 6 for 21 at one stage, slipping from a comfortable 129 for 1. Brunt took four of those wickets in the course of a four-over second spell, having already dismissed the opener Jemimah Rodrigues with the new ball.
Of her wickets, Smriti Mandhana’s may have been a touch lucky, the India vice-captain pulling a long-hop straight to deep midwicket for 66, the highest score of India’s innings. Punam Raut, also on a comeback, made 56 before Brunt bowled her with an in-ducker.It took a stodgy 47-run stand between Shikha Pandey and Deepti Sharma to lift them to 205 for 8. Brunt finished with 5 for 28.
In the final ODI too, there was the familiar early collapse, this time against the seam of Jhulan Goswami, who sent back the top three as England slipped to 49 for 5.Wyatt walked in at No.7 and immediately made run accumulation look easy, leaving her imprint on the tour after sitting out the first two ODIs. Picked only because of an injury to Sophie Ecclestone, Wyatt milked runs steadily to make an 82-ball 56, along the way adding 69 with her captain Knight.
Elwiss went on to see the chase home and remained unbeaten on 33. Brunt, who would have liked to cool off after an intense spell, made 18 crucial runs to take England to within two runs of victory.Anya Shrubsole then walloped a boundary to complete the formalities.Scores: England women 208 for 8 (Wyatt 56, Knight 47, Elwiss 33*, Goswami 3-41, Pandey 2-34) beat India women 205 for 8 (Mandhana 66, Raut 56, Brunt 5-28) by two wickets.

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