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Posts tagged as 6th Ave. N. Koncsek

Edmonds Arts Commission showcases local artists’ work

The City of Edmonds Arts Commission is featuring three temporary public art installations and art exhibits through the month of March.

Ceramic sculptures by Meadowdale High School senior Lauren Craig are displayed in the McDevitt Youth Art Display Case in the Frances Anderson Center, located at 700 Main St.Edmonds, through March. The theme of Craig’s work is “fantasy,” which gave her the flexibility to create a variety of pieces from a large castle and a female bust, to coffee mugs and small vases.She works primarily in ceramics, but is also a painter. Over the years, a selection of her paintings and ceramic pieces have been chosen for the Edmonds Arts Festival Youth Art Gallery, the Edmonds School District Calendar and the Meadowdale High School magazine, Unmasked.
Craig is passionate about all types of art, and is actively working to develop her skills as an artist.Jacob Smithers images are a study of metaphors found in everyday objects and his hope is that viewers will be compelled to step out of their busy lives for just a moment to consider the photos and their accompanying statements.
Smithers’ abstract photos are on exhibit through the end of March in the Edmonds Library art exhibit area. Framed in reclaimed vintage building materials, his images are a study of metaphors found in everyday objects.His hope is that viewers will be compelled to step out of their busy lives for just a moment to consider the photos and their accompanying statements. For more information about Jacob Smithers, go to www.jacobsmithersphotography.com.The Arts Commission also offers an opportunity for regional artists to create temporary outdoor art installations on three fence lines in downtown Edmonds.The Arts Commission is interested in encouraging a visual conversation through the installations, as well as highlighting the works of emerging and established artists.1 of 2Each line of Elise Koncsek’s poem “Welcome, Immigrants,” which can be read backward and forward, appears in groups of six languages — English, Spanish, Chinese, Hindi, Russian and Korean.“I believe that when we know more about something, we connect with it, and we are then more likely to care about it and take positive action in protecting the environment,” she said.

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